Jack Roberts

Like many woodturners, I turned my first wooden bowl in high school in the 1960’s in my shop class. But I did not get passionate about woodturning until a friend introduced me to turning green wood around 2007.  I really got bitten by the bug for turning green wood and went all-in: I bought a saw mill, started a company with my wife and a business partner and started selling green turning blanks to Woodcraft stores across the US.  We were selling and shipping wood to 56 of the 84 stores in 2008 and 2009.

At the same time I started turning in earnest, I joined my local woodturning club, Bell Woodturners, and started doing demonstrations.  Later, I branched out and started doing demos to other clubs in the region. I was elected club president of Bell Woodturners for four years starting in 2012.

At the same time I started turning in earnest, I joined my local woodturning club, Bell Woodturners, and started doing demonstrations.  Later, I branched out and started doing demos to other clubs in the region. I was elected club president of Bell Woodturners for four years starting in 2012.

But I’m not just a woodturner – many people know me and my work for the colors, designs, and finishes on my pieces.

Those skills have come from my professional background.  In college, I started doing custom paint work on cars – particularly Corvettes, sports cars and muscle cars.  I have continued doing automotive refinishing professionally since then. I am experienced in automotive body repairs and refinishing, including a large variety of paints and clear coats.  I have brought my years of experience with these processes and products to enhance my wood turnings for a unique body of work.

My turning specialties:

Turnings: Boxes, Bowls (smooth and natural edge), platters and Hollow forms.

Finishes: Water based paints, Dyes, Acrylics, lacquers, and automotive clear coats.

Website: http://woodturningwithjack.com/

Demonstrations

Turning, texturing, and coloring a Box on a face plate

This is a simple way for beginners to start making boxes, it is also a production way to produce boxes for sale.  This box is made without a chuck.  The underside of the top is turned  first, then the top is reversed and fitted to the base.  The parts are textured and dyed as you go before they come off the lathe.  After the base is parted off and the bottom cleaned up the entire box is clear coated with spray lacquer.

Handout – Making a box with a faceplate

Turning and embellishing a “Signature” Box

This box is made from three different pieces of wood.  A lighter wood is sandwiched between two darker kinds of wood. Mortise and tenon are used between the bottom and center with a mortise and tenon fitting top.  The center section is then dyed black and embellished with pyrography or painting.  The top may be embellished with an embedded resin casting.

Handout – Making your Signature Box